Building & Development2018-07-23T11:23:13+00:00
3012, 2011

Anatomy of an NFRC Label for Windows

By |December 30th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials, Doors & Windows|

The US Department of Energy partnering with the National Fenestration Rating Council have developed the NFRC label. It summarizes all of the main points that are important in deciding which windows will work for your home and your climate. These ratings apply to the whole window, not just the component parts. NFRC labels gauge energy performance and provide a way

3012, 2011

Insulation Materials

By |December 30th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials, Green Building|

You mean there’s something other than the PINK stuff? For years, the standard material for insulation has been fiberglass batt. Think Pink Panther. And while fiberglass batt may be the right insulation for either part or all of your project, it’s worth taking a look at newer materials that are transforming the way we insulate.   Fiberglass Fiberglass insulation is

1112, 2011

Framing Choices

By |December 11th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials|

Framing is like the skeleton of your home.  It is the structure around which your home is built.  Its strength and thermal bridge qualities are the two of the main concerns when choosing framing.  Advances in engineered wood and SIPs have made them very interesting alternatives to traditional stick framing. Dimensional Lumber The most common framing material in residential construction,

2811, 2011

Roofing Choices

By |November 28th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials|

Sun, rain, snow, and wind exposure all day, every day for years - and it’s supposed to look great and function flawlessly. Here’s a look at some of the more “exotic” options in roofing. Please remember when looking at installed costs, the complexity of the roof line design can cause big swings in labor costs. Slate CHARACTERISTICS: Natural stone, noticeable

2811, 2011

Exterior Materials – Fiber Cement

By |November 28th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials|

In many instances, especially here in Nashville where we have hot, humid weather, fiber cement board is replacing wood as a facing material. Fiber cement board is a mixture of 90% cement/sand and 10% wood fiber. Fiber cement boards are much heavier than wood. Fiber cement boards come in siding, shingles and panels with textures that range from wood, stucco

2811, 2011

Exterior Materials – Stone

By |November 28th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials|

Used effectively for thousands of years, stone is one of the most beautiful options in siding. Given its expense, many people choose to use stone as an accent and blend it with another siding material but if you have the budget, a stone exterior will take your home to another level. In Tennessee, many types of limestone are locally available

2811, 2011

Exterior Materials – Wood

By |November 28th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials|

Solid wood siding can be used as boards, shingles and shakes. Wood siding can be made from many species of wood including cedar, yellow poplar, redwood, white pine, spruce, and Douglas fir. Note: with redwood and cedar, corrosion can occur from the nails unless you use stainless-steel nails. Regardless of the species of the wood, it is imperative that all

2811, 2011

Exterior Materials – Brick

By |November 28th, 2011|Categories: Building Materials|

The siding you choose for your home’s exterior has a HUGE impact on the look of your home so it is important to choose one that complements your architectural design. Other considerations are cost, maintenance, and insulating value. In this section, we leave the design questions to your architect, and focus on the functional and financial aspects of siding.  

2811, 2011

R-Value and Low-E Explained

By |November 28th, 2011|Categories: Green Building|

R-Value and Low-E are two terms that you will hear constantly when discussing many materials used in constructing your home. We’ll take a look first at why these values are important and how they affect your material selections.   Poorly insulated homes are more expensive to heat because the heat that you’re producing doesn’t stay in your home for very

1909, 2011

5 Basics of Green Building

By |September 19th, 2011|Categories: Green Building|

1. Site Selection Green building begins with the site that you choose.  Building on land that is in a developed area, connected to main roads and electrical and water systems impacts the environment less than developing pristine land. The way you position your home on the lot also makes a huge impact on the performance of your home.  By minimizing